Icon Definitions & Terminology

    

Quick Links

14-Day Learning Mode
See Learning Mode

Barometric Pressure
Barometric Pressure History Chart
Pressure Trend Arrow

Clock
Atomic
Intelli-Time

Dew Point

"Feels Like" Temperature

Forecast
See Weather Forecast

Heat Index

Humidity
High / Low Records
Home Comfort Icon
Humidity Level Icon
Humidity Trend Arrow

Learning Mode
Moon Phase
Multi-Variable History Chart

 

Temperature
High / Low Records
Temperature Trend Arrow

What-to-Wear

Weather Forecast
Future Forecast
Precision Forecasting
Self-Calibrating Forecasting
Weather Forecast Icons 

Weather Ticker

Wind
Average Wind Speed
Current Wind Speed
Peak Wind Speed
Wind Chill

Wireless Signal Reception Icon

Weather Trend Arrow
See Pressure Trend Arrow

 


Barometric Pressure History Chartbarometric pressure chart

A pressure graph tracks and displays the historical barometric pressure over an allotted amount of time up to the current time. The chart curve represents the rate of change over this allotted time period. An example of a 12-hour barometric pressure history chart is pictured on the right:

back to top

Dew Point

The dew point is a measure of moisture in the air, or more specifically, the temperature at which the air becomes 100% fully saturated with water. The dew point formula relies on environmental data including the relative humidity and ambient air temperature, and is only calculated when temperatures are between 40 to 79 degrees Fahrenheit (4 to 26 degrees Celsius).

The dew point temperature will always be lower than or equal to the air temperature. For example, let's say your weather station records an outdoor temperature of 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius) and a humidity reading of 80%. The temperature at which these two values intersect is the dew point. In this example, dew will begin to form at 44 degrees Fahrenheit (7 degrees Celsius).

When the air temperature equals that of the dew point (a relative humidity of 100%), clouds and fog begin to form. As the air temperature gets cooler, the dew point must also fall, causing precipitation as water vapors are rapidly removed from the air. During warmer seasons, the dew point temperature can be a good indicator of how humid the outside air feels, as well as how likely it is to rain or storm.

back to top

"Feels Like" Temperature

The "feels like" temperature is a measurement of how hot or cold it really feels like outside. The “Feels Like” temperature relies on environmental data including the ambient air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed to determine how weather conditions feel to bare skin. 

Different combinations of temperature, humidity, and wind speed can increase the sensation of being hot or cold. For example, skin that is exposed to wind and cold temperatures will make a person feel that it is colder outside than it really is because heat is drawn away from the body at a faster rate. As another example, a day that is very humid may feel hotter than it really is outside because your body sweat does not evaporate (and thereby cool the body) the way it is intended.

back to top

Heat Index

Heat index is a measurement of how hot it really feels outside. The heat index formula relies on environmental data including the ambient air temperature and relative humidity, and is only calculated when temperatures exceed 80 degrees Fahrenheit (27 degrees Celsius).  

The heat alerts initiated by the National Weather Service are mainly based on heat index values. Excessive heat can be a safety and health hazard. For an example of heat index, let's say your weather station records an outdoor temperature of 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32.2 degrees Celsius) and a humidity reading of 60%. The temperature at which these two values intersect is the heat index. In this example, it will feel like it is 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) outside.

Related Information: www.nws.noaa.gov/os/heat/index.html#heatindex

 back to top

High / Low Records

AcuRite products track a variety of high / low record types: daily, 24-hour, monthly and all-time.

• If the unit has a clock the daily high / low record is the highest / lowest data recorded since midnight. 

• As a general rule of thumb, if the unit does not have a clock, the high / low records clear every 24 hours. The time records clear each day is determined by the time the battery was installed. For example, if the battery was installed at 6:00 pm, then high/low records will reset at 6:00 pm daily.

Monthly high / low is the highest / lowest data recorded throughout the calendar month, beginning on the 1st day of the month and clearing at midnight on the last day of the month.  

All-time high / low is the highest / lowest data recorded since the unit was first powered on or since batteries were installed.

 

 back to top

Humidity Level Icon

AcuRite's weather and environment products that track indoor humidity feature a humidity level icon, or home comfort icon, to easily convey a low, high or ideal humidity level for your health and home environment. Humidity can have a large impact on your personal comfort, health safety and valuables (learn more). The ideal humidity level, or home comfort, is determined through relative humidity (RH) levels, per the chart below:

low humidity home comfort

humidity OK for home comfort

humidity HIGH for home comfort

 

LOW Humidity Level
Less than 25% RH
Humidity level is low relative to the temperature. This makes for a dry environment.

 

OK Humidity Level
Between 25% - 55% RH
Humidity level is OK relative to the temperature. This makes for a comfortable environment.

 

HIGH Humidity Level
Over 55% RH
Humidity level is high relative to the temperature. This makes for a humid environment.

 


 back to top

 Humidity Trend Arrow

The Humidity Trend directional arrow icon will show one of the following three humidity trend directions, indicating potential future conditions:

humidity trend icon


 back to top

Learning Mode

Learning Mode is a time span during which AcuRite products utilize a unique algorithm to analyze changes in pressure and temperature over time to determine your altitude. During Learning Mode, AcuRite products have a Learning Mode icon on screen. After 14 days, the Learning Mode icon disappears from the display screen. At this point, the self-calibrated pressure is tuned in to your location and the forecaster is fairly accurate, however Learning Mode continues to calibrate for a total of 33.33 days. Learn More

 back to top

Multi-Variable History Chartmulti variable weather history chart

AcuRite multi-variable history charts feature a selectable history mode that tracks and displays the changes in conditions for more than one type of data over an allotted time period. Examples of the type of information that multi-variable charts track include barometric pressure, temperature, humidity and wind speed. You can toggle between the multiple charts. The charts allow you to monitor the rate of change over time up to the current time (typically the last 12 hours: -12, -6, -3, -2, -1, 0). An example of a multi-variable chart is pictured on the right:


 back to top

Pressure or Weather Trend Arrow

Subtle variations in barometric pressure greatly impact the weather. The Weather Trend directional arrow icon will show one of the following three barometric pressure trend directions, indicating potential future weather conditions:

pressure trend icon


 back to top

Temperature Trend Arrow

The Temperature Trend directional arrow icon will show one of the following three humidity trend directions, indicating potential future conditions:

temperature trend icon


 back to top

Weather Forecast or Future Forecast

The Weather Forecast icon is a prediction of conditions for the next 12 to 24 hours based on the data observed from your weather sensor.

Forecast Version

Models

Forecast Version

 Models

Acurite Icons Version A
Version A




75075, 75077,
75107

Acurite Icons Version B
Version B

 

 00436, 00502, 00615,
00608, 00621, 00623,
00634, 00638, 00639,
01010, 01015, 01033,
01056, 01086, 01097,
01098, 01099, 01500,
01502, 01514, 01515, 01602,
02001, 02008, 06017RM, 75329

Acurite Icons Version C
Version C

 

 

01050, 01055, 01055A1, 01512
02005, 02007, 02010, 
02014, 02015, 02030,
02031, 02036, 02037

Acurite Icons Version D
Version D



00250, 00251W, 00252W, 00838, 
01025, 01035, 01036, 
01525, 02032

Acurite Icons Version E
Version E 



00439DI, 00589, 00821, 00828, 00829, 
01301, 01506, 01524, 01524A1, 01604, 02016, 
02038W, 02039CA, 02040CASB, 02041CASB, 13230
 

Acurite Icons Version F

Version F



 00622, 01604, 02022, 02026, 02027

Acurite Icons Version G
Version G 



00828BPDI, 00829
08575, 08580

 

 

What-to-Wear Icon

The What-to-Wear icon provides a clothing recommendation based on the data observed from your weather sensor.

Version #1

Version #2

acurite what to wear icons

Models: 00526, 00536, 00837

acurite what to wear icons

 Models: 00827, 00837W


 back to top

Weather Ticker

The Weather Ticker automatically streams your real-time weather information and alerts as scrolling text on the display unit. You can customize which messages or data you'd like to be displayed. Standard Weather Ticker messages include a text readout of: forecast, moon phase, indoor comfort, "feels like" temperature, weekly / monthly / all-time high and low records, etc.

 back to top

Wind Chill

The wind chill is a measure of how cold it really feels outside. The wind chill formula relies on environmental data including the wind speed and the ambient air temperature, and is only calculated when temperatures drop below 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius).

Wind chill makes it feel colder than it really is due to the loss of body heat when exposed skin is in direct contact with the wind and cold temperatures. Heat is drawn away from the body at a faster rate when wind speed increases. For example, your weather station may report that the outdoor temperature is 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-7 degrees Celsius) with a wind speed of 10 mph (16 kph). The temperature at which these two values intersect is the wind chill. In this example, it will feel like it is 9 degrees Fahrenheit (-13 degrees Celsius).

Related Information: www.nws.noaa.gov/os/windchill/index.shtml

 

 back to top

Wind Speed

Current Wind Speed: AcuRite's 3-in-1 sensor and 5-in-1 sensor transmit wind speed data every 18 seconds. Current wind speed is the highest wind speed recorded over that 18 second window.

Average Wind Speed: An average of all wind speed readings collected over the past 2 minutes.

Peak Wind Speed: A rolling value showing the highest wind speed recorded over the past 60 minutes.

 back to top

Wireless Signal Reception Icon

For easy setup and superior performance, AcuRite wireless products feature signal reception indicator icons. If there are a low number of “bars” present, you may experience no data display ( “--” ) or inaccurate data. In either case, you may need to relocate the display, the sensor or both for improved reception. Keep in mind, wireless products must be positioned away from electronics that may interfere with the wireless communication (such as TVs, microwaves, computers, etc).   

If most or all 4 of the bars are present, wireless reception is good and no action is required:

wireless reception icons

 back to top