Free U.S. shipping on orders $50+

Tracking and Reporting Local Weather History with AcuRite

Tracking and Reporting Local Weather History with AcuRite
Posted in: Who Uses AcuRite
By Gregory Syroney, Storm Chaser, Scioto County, OH
More from this author

Tracking and Reporting Local Weather History with AcuRite

One of the most important assets to a storm chaser or storm spotter is a good, reliable weather station. Accurate reports from personal stations can help weather trackers decide whether or not to report their weather data to the National Weather Service. Typically, the data that is significant enough to report includes rainfall that amounts to an inch or more within an hour or damage from high winds like broken tree limbs. I have two AcuRite Iris™ weather stations reporting in from two different locations, so I have enhanced weather data reporting capabilities.

AcuRite Iris Weather Sensor

A major benefit of having weather stations set up in more than one location is that I now have information and weather logs detailing how typical and severe weather events affected different areas in our region. Many news channels will check online weather station sites for independent data when they are looking for conditions to report on, and with my weather stations in separate places, I can offer comparative weather data.

I also value being able to access my stations’ records in My AcuRite®, as I simply like to look back in the historical data to analyze and track trends, records, and extremes on my temperature, wind speed, and rainfall data. These are great tools to have, and looking at the history of your weather station ensures that you will always remember how the days with especially heavy rain or abnormally high temperatures and heat indexes impacted your region and the community.

I am excited to have these two weather stations online so that others are able to view our daily conditions and our weather history. I want to thank AcuRite for their donations and their support of the Scioto County Storm Chaser Center, which is part of the nonprofit organization that I run. I also volunteer with the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network (which we refer to as CoCoRaHS) out of Fort Collins, Colorado.

Anyone can take a peek at our current weather from wherever they are by viewing either the main headquarters weather station page or the Portsmouth weather station page, which are updated automatically to stay as current as possible.

September 1, 2021
Comments
Blog Comments